The popular drink that could be hiding your entire day's worth of sugar – Daily Express


We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info
According to the NHS, adults should have no more than 30g of sugar each day. This is why checking the nutrition label on your foods is so vital. But what happens when your food does not have a nutrition label?
That is indeed the case with most alcoholic beverages, and something the Alcohol Health Alliance is calling into question after uncovering shocking findings from a new survey.
According to their research, some brands of wine contain an adult’s entire daily recommended sugar intake in just one glass.
For particularly sweet offerings, they can even soar to double this.
Based on their research, the Alcohol Health Alliance found that some wines, such as sparkling pink Moscato, contain as much as 59.1g of sugar in a 175ml glass.
READ MORE: Pancreatic cancer: Three sensations indicative of a ‘tumour’
People drinking rose wine
Other rose wines, such as a Moscato, can contain up to 47.7g of sugar in a 175ml of wine.
In both cases, this equates to around three teaspoons of sugar per glass.
Other fruit wines, infused with berries, can contain up to 39.3g of wine in a 175ml glass.
The Alcohol Health Alliance warned: “Government guidelines recommend no more than 30g of free sugars per day for an adult – yet it’s possible to reach almost this entire amount of sugar by drinking just two medium-sized glasses of some of the most popular wine on the market.”
DON’T MISS
Cancer: The food shown to have a ‘direct association’ to cancer [REVEALED]
Bradley Walsh health: Doctors warned star to ‘get fit’ after ‘concern’ [COMMENT]
Coronavirus: The best way to reduce risk of long Covid [EXPLAINER]

The analysis found that the products containing the most sugar actually turned out to be those of a lower strength which may be concerning for those who are trying to limit their alcohol consumption.
The Alcohol Health Alliance added: “With no legal requirement to display sugar content on alcohol labels, drinkers opting for a lower-strength alcohol choice, perhaps thinking this is a healthier option, are unwittingly upping their daily sugar intake.
“This can lead to an increased risk of health conditions such as type-two diabetes and tooth decay.”
Professor Merlin Thomas from Monash University’s department of epidemiology and preventive medicine pointed out the importance of moderation when it comes to such beverages.
Teaspoon of sugar
The analysis found that the products containing the most sugar actually turned out to be those of a lower strength which may be concerning for those who are trying to limit their alcohol consumption.
The Alcohol Health Alliance added: “With no legal requirement to display sugar content on alcohol labels, drinkers opting for a lower-strength alcohol choice, perhaps thinking this is a healthier option, are unwittingly upping their daily sugar intake.
“This can lead to an increased risk of health conditions such as type-two diabetes and tooth decay.”
Professor Merlin Thomas from Monash University’s department of epidemiology and preventive medicine pointed out the importance of moderation when it comes to such beverages.
How to live longer graphic
“A more practical solution is to enjoy the drink we love; only in moderation, and preferably with a meal, friends and loved ones.”
Moderation is not only important for controlling your sugar intake but can also be vital for overall health.
Professor Thomas said: “Moderation is mostly magical because heavy drinking is so fundamentally bad for our health.
“Heavy intemperate drinkers have more heart disease, high blood pressure, dementia and some cancers (especially of the breast and the colon).
“Even episodic excessive alcohol intake (also known as binge drinking, amounting to more than four drinks within a few hours, often with the intent of becoming intoxicated), is associated with an increased risk of an early death.”
See today’s front and back pages, download the newspaper, order back issues and use the historic Daily Express newspaper archive.

source


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.