The FDA considers a "healthy" food label – Axios

The FDA considers a "healthy" food label – Axios

The Food and Drug Administration is testing designs of a label that food manufacturers could voluntarily put on the front of packages indicating that a product is "healthy."
Why it matters: The effort is controversial, in part because the meaning of "healthy" continues to evolve. The FDA itself is in the process of updating its definition, which dates back to 1994.
Where it stands: The FDA is conducting two tests with consumers of possible "healthy" food logos as part of its goal to "improve dietary patterns in the United States, to help reduce the burden of diet-related chronic diseases and advance health equity."
Among the goals, the FDA says, are to provide consumers who have an unsophisticated understanding of nutrition with an easy way to make choices in the supermarket — and to coax food manufacturers to improve their products.
Of note: In 2015, the FDA told the makers of KIND fruit-and-nut bars to stop using the term "healthy" on packaging because of the product’s fat levels, only to reverse its decision the following year and clarify its guidance on the use of the term.
The other side: Experts who study the efficacy of labeling schemes say that what works best is a mandatory system of warning labels on packaged food that isn’t good for you.
The bottom line: In public comments on the FDA’s proposal, several big companies and trade groups suggested that the agency was putting the cart before the horse by crafting a "healthy" label before nailing down new nutrition guidelines.

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