Is Food Medicine? – Bel Marra Health


hamburger line 1
hamburger line 2
hamburger line 3
Close
Get this report FREE when you opt in for our FREE Health eTalk daily newsletter along with exclusive offers from
Bel Marra Health and third party partners
You can opt-out any time. Privacy Policy
Home » Health News » Is Food Medicine?
A man preparing a healthy dinner of baked broccoli. Healthy food conceptIt’s possible by now you’ve heard the phrase “food as medicine.” It’s a theory that food can cure or prevent disease and illness, particularly prevalent on social media.
But is there anything to it?
Advertisement
Of course, there is plenty of evidence that a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, whole grains, and lean proteins, while being low in processed foods, can reduce the risk for a host of health conditions, including obesity, type-2 diabetes, heart disease, and more.
There is even evidence that certain antioxidant compounds and nutrients found in these items and foods like spices, tea, and coffee may help fight inflammation and, at times, promote a degree of healing.
Certain compounds in broccoli, for example, have been found to promote better liver health.
The concept of food as medicine is primarily based on prioritizing food and diet in a person’s health plan to either prevent, reduce symptoms of, or reverse disease.
There is enough evidence to suggest that food can help promote better health, prevent illness, and even potentially restore health.
Advertisement
But it is also essential to remember that food and nutrition are not a cure-all or a guarantee of immaculate health. Genetic factors, environmental factors, or autoimmune conditions or predispositions are factors in a person’s overall health profile and risk.
Further, using diet to treat a diagnosed condition is not necessarily going to work, either. Sometimes medicine is what’s needed. And although adopting a healthy diet is unlikely to hurt and likely to be beneficial, it is unlikely to restore health independently or medical treatment.
Using a healthy diet to complement treatment is probably a good idea, particularly because it can help establish good eating habits. If a condition is effectively treated with medicine, diet may help recurring flare-ups or future trouble.
Author Bio
About eight years ago, Mat Lecompte had an epiphany. He’d been ignoring his health and suddenly realized he needed to do something about it. Since then, through hard work, determination and plenty of education, he has transformed his life. He’s changed his body composition by learning the ins and outs of nutrition, exercise, and fitness and wants to share his knowledge with you. Starting as a journalist over 10 years ago, Mat has not only honed his belief system and approach with practical experience, but he has also worked closely with nutritionists, dieticians, athletes, and fitness professionals. He embraces natural healing methods and believes that diet, exercise and willpower are the foundation of a healthy, happy, and drug-free existence.
Advertisement
Five-Star Guarantee of Satisfaction

source


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.