Health care workers hit new breaking point – Axios


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Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios
The ranks of health care workers are dwindling and stretching what it means to be reaching their "breaking points," particularly at small nonprofit hospitals.
The big picture: Even as Omicron cases have begun to wane in some places, many hospitals are still fielding a crush of patients amid record employee callouts.
Yes, but: There’s also a growing amount of frustration, burnout and compassion fatigue straining the workforce, the New York Times wrote over the weekend.
What they’re saying: "The pandemic has laid bare the myriad inefficiencies and frank failures in our health-care system that we had managed to paper over until a real crisis came along," Megan Ranney, academic dean at the Brown University School of Public Health, wrote in the Washington Post.
Editor’s note: This story originally published on Jan. 24.
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