COVID-19: Information for Close Contacts – Ministry of Health

COVID-19: Information for Close Contacts – Ministry of Health

Information on contact tracing, types of contacts and when to isolate or stay at home.
Last updated: 15 February 2022
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In light of new variants of COVID-19, such as Omicron, the Ministry’s approach to case management and contact tracing will continue to be updated to reduce widespread community transmission.
If you live with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 (a case) then you may receive a phone call from us or a public health unit (PHU) providing you with advice on testing, self-isolation and checking on your health and wellbeing. Our call centre staff will identify themselves and inform you that they are calling from the National Investigation and Tracing Centre (NITC). They will also verify your name and contact details. These calls will usually come from (09) 801 3009 or (09) 306 8748.
You may be told that you are a close contact by your employer, school or someone you know who has tested positive for COVID-19. You may also receive a text message telling you that you are a close contact which will provide you with a link to find out what this means. If you have a NZ mobile, then these texts will come from 2328. If you are concerned that a text is not genuine, you can call or email Healthline and request a call back. 
If you use the NZ COVID Tracer app and have Bluetooth enabled, you may get an orange alert telling you that you are a close contact. The alert will tell you what to do – it is important that you follow these instructions.
Information on how to contact Healthline if you are deaf or hard of hearing can be found at COVID-19: Information and advice for the deaf community.
Learn more about the NZ COVID Tracer app.
If you have been identified as a Close Contact of someone with COVID-19, you are at a higher risk of being infected with COVID-19. You might live with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, or you may be a close contact for other reasons. The guidance for close contacts is below. 
Regardless of guidelines for testing and self-isolation, any time you develop symptoms of COVID-19, get a test.
All household members who live with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 (a case) are household Close Contacts.
If you live with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 you must follow these steps (whether you are vaccinated against COVID-19 or not):
The factsheet below provides helpful information on COVID-19 and precautions you can take to keep yourself and your loved ones safe. The fact sheet should be read together with the advice on self-isolation or staying at home at Advice for people with COVID-19 and any specific advice that may be given to you by your doctor, Healthline (0800 358 5453) or public health official.
Last update 14 February 2022.
Fact sheets for close contacts are also available in other languages on Unite Against COVID-19.
You are considered a close contact if you have:
If you have been told you are a close contact, then (whether you are vaccinated against COVID-19 or not):
You can end your self-isolation after 7 days, so long as you have no new or worsening symptoms and a negative day 5 test (that is, on day 8 you can go back to work or school or normal daily life).
If you are a close contact who is vaccinated and asymptomatic, you may be able to continue to work through the Close Contact Exemption Scheme, if you work for a critical service.
The factsheet below provides helpful information on COVID-19 and precautions you can take to keep yourself and your loved ones safe. The fact sheet should be read together with the advice on self-isolation or staying at home at Advice for people with COVID-19 and any specific advice that may be given to you by your doctor, Healthline (0800 358 5453) or public health official.
Last updated 14 February 2022.
Fact sheets for close contacts are also available in other languages on Unite Against COVID-19.
The Ministry of Social Development (MSD) is available to help you. Most people can manage self-isolation with help from whānau, family and friends. There may be financial help available if you need it. MSD can also connect you to local community organisations for help with food and other welfare needs.
There are section 70 orders that legally require those who have been identified as a close contact to isolate at home. Read the section 70 public health orders.
You can find out how your personal information is managed throughout the contact tracing process at COVID-19: Your privacy.
Page last updated: 15 February 2022

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